Hightech and History

KSPG’s home in Celaya, Mexico

Since 2006 KSPG has been present in the Central American country. Heartbeat introduces the Mexican home of Kolbenschmidt, Pierburg and KS Gleitlager in the state of Guanajuato.

In 2014, some 3.2 million automobiles were manufactured in Mexico, making the country the world’s seventh largest auto producer. Hosting factories from VW, GM, Honda,Mazda, and Hyundai, the federal state of Guanajuato is a major center of the Mexican automotive industry. KSPG has been present in Guanajuato since 2006, or more precisely in Celaya. The city and its homonymous municipio (roughly equating to an American county) are home to a population of around 470,000 today. Besides the automotive sector, the food industry—especially dairy products—is a major employer in Guanajuato.

Founded in 1570, the city is famous throughout Mexico for one food in particular: cajeta, a confection made of caramelized goat and cow milk. The historic center of this vibrant city boasts many buildings from the colonial period and the first years of Mexican independence. Many of these were designed by perhaps the city’s most prominent son: the architect, painter, and sculptor Francisco Eduardo Tresguerras 1745–1833. Beyond this, Celaya has everything that characterizes Mexico: friendly people, a lively society, and fantastic food!

KSPG in Celaya, Mexico

Kolbenschmidt de MéxicoPierburg Pump Technology MéxicoKS Gleitlager de México
640 employees105 employees84 employees
Founded:
Piston production started in 1993, since 2006 part of KSGP
Founded:
2007 in Chihuahua, since 2009 in Celaya
Founded:
2012

Sales (2015):
$ 116.6 million

Sales:
$ 32.7 million

Sales:
$ 16 Million


Diá de Muertos

On November 2, the “Day of the Dead” is celebrated— not dreaded!—all over Mexico. The national mood on this special day is anything but mournful—it’s a colorful popular festival. The streets are bedecked with flowers, there are special candies for the children, and the “Calavera de Catrina,” a sumptuously attired woman’s skeleton, is omnipresent—as are numerous skulls, bones, and other symbols of death.